Barn Owl (Tyto alba) hunting at a church bell tower at Heredia Costa Rica. Barn Owls are nature's best pest control. It was recorded that after two years, 18 mating pairs of owls had moved in and removed over 25,000 rodents from the property. One reason barn owls in particular make good pest removers is their wide range of habitats. The owls are found from fields to forests in the Americas, Europe, Africa, India, Southeast Asia, and Australia.

Owls of Costa Rica

Since I started with wildlife photography, owls have fascinated me.

Just finding and observing these remarkable creatures during the night it’s pretty challenging, let alone to photograph them successfully.

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Resplendent Quetzal (Pharomachrus mocinno) feeding chick in nest Feature

Resplendent Quetzal and the Forest

If ever there existed an ultimate symbol of the beauty embodied by birds, the Resplendent Quetzal would certainly qualify

Rare, stunningly beautiful, elusive, and limited to the remote and mist-draped cloud forests of Central America, this bird, with its shimmering golden green and blood-red feathers.

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Oncilla at the highlands of Costa Rica

A year camera trapping in the highlands of Costa Rica

I had a project in mind at the start of this year to get some nice images of the elusive highlands cats of Costa Rica, like the Oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus) and the Margay (Leopardus wiedii).

But before setting up the “high-end” camera traps, I needed to know where to put them, where the animals where walking at night, how where they moving, etc. So I decided to found this out this year by setting up game cameras in the highlands of Costa Rica

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White-collared Manakin (Manacus candei) male feeding from fruits at the lowlands of Costa Rica.

Cover of Oecologia

Nice to see my image of a White-collared Manakins (Manacus candei) on the cover of Oecologia.

In this issue, Wolfe et al. show that dry El Niño events were associated with strikingly low manakin survival in young forests, while El Niño events had little effect on survival in mature forests. These results suggest that mature forests may serve as refugia for fruit-eating birds during periods of climatic instability.

A little more info can be found at here

 

Long-billed Hermit (Phaethornis longirostris) in flight under the rain at the low lands of Costa Rica.

The rates of avian community development in forest canopy and understorey

It’s always nice to see my images put to good use. Tom it’s using my “Free to use for education” license for a poster in the annual Fellows Symposium at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama City for The rates of avian community development in forest canopy and understory.
Very interesting poster!

If you want to learn more about my “Education and conversation licenses” you can follow this link

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